Music

“Nah, you don’t want to listen to that anymore! Check this out” My friend said as he handed me a cassette tape to put into my Walkman. It was 1991, a primary school playground in Cambridge and the moment my love of electronic music started. We were all moonwalking and jumping around to the latest release from New Kids on the Block as the genre defining and genre creating rave culture that was sweeping the nation finally hit me in a fairly unexciting part of the UK.

Names like Obsession, Fantazia, The Edge and Moondance were holding events all around the country showcasing a wide range of DJs playing early house, hardcore and techno. It was that inclusiveness and freedom from the social traditions of the time that captivated so many young people in that era. Events with tens of thousands of people just there to dance the night away were just unheard of and drove both the surge in culture.

My initial love was firmly fixed in the Jungle camp with DJ / Producers such and Hype, Roni Size, LTJ Bukem and of course the mercurial Goldie turning me into a bedroom DJ and part time university radio
station presenter.

Of course, like many life journeys, I turned away from this to focus on a career. Being the son of a first-generation migrant, life advice pretty much started and ended at “be a doctor or a lawyer or just don’t be my son”. A tough but understandable position from people that just wanted the best and most comfortable lives for their children. It wasn’t until around 15 years after starting a degree a combination of self-awareness, new friendships and an interest in ancient civilisations brought me back.

I realised that music was omnipresent and that it was a form of expression and creativity that shouldn’t be ignored. Modern society tends to tell us is how to spend our time in a way that in most instances leaves creative and artistic parts of ourselves untouched and unfulfilled.

So, in homage to societies that valued dance, art, expression and creativity as much as the patriarchal values we have today such as money and technology, I established Matriarchal Society. Something to represent the house & techno I play and will produce as well as a call to action for everyone to find their balance and rediscover what caught the imagination of their younger
selves all that time ago…

P.S. – RIP Stevie Hyper D!